Why drink Izumio water? It is a known fact that users can derive a lot of health benefits by drinking hydrogenized water. Manufacturers of Izumio water have ensured to add good amounts of minerals also to it apart from the large quantities of hydrogen in it. Therefore, this water is even more beneficial to users. In other words, the health benefits you can have by drinking this water on a regular basis are much more than what you can get by drinking normal potable water or even water that has only been hydrogenized. Let us delve a little deeper. 1. Researchers have time and again been insisting on the ill effects of fluoride that gets into our body through various sources, the main among them being the water we drink. Some of the negative effects of fluoride on our health are that our bones can become brittle, the functioning of our brain can become haywire and our cognitive development may get decelerated. Fluoride can negatively impact the functioning of our thyroid glands also and this may result in obesity or mental depression. Izumio water can be a panacea for all these issues because it is capable of nullifying the negative effects of fluoride on our system. 2. The so-called potable water we consume daily has been tested a number of times and most of the test results reveal that the water contains lead. Lead is so dangerous that it can retard neurological development in us and cause nervous disorders. Since Izumio water contains lots of hydrogen and a good amount of minerals, it can help us in protecting ourselves from the ill effects of lead. 3. Researches have revealed that certain hormones can wreck havoc on the health of children and, more particularly, on their sexual development. If children are made to drink Izumio water regularly, parents need not worry about this issue. 4. Researchers have also found that Bisphenol-A can lower fertility levels in people and can cause various types of cancers such as breast cancer, prostate cancer, etc. If people drink Izumio water on a regular basis, they can protect themselves from these bad effects of Bisphenol-A. 5. Another cancer-causing substance is chlorophenol and Izumio water can help in preventing this dreadful disease as well. 6. Izumio water is capable of reversing the damages the body cells suffer. Damaged body cells may cause several health issues such as many types of cancers, premature aging, neurological disorders, dementia and so on. In short, users can derive a number of health benefits by drinking Izumio water regularly.

hy drink Izumio water?

It is a known fact that users can derive a lot of health benefits by drinking hydrogenized water. Manufacturers of Izumio water have ensured to add good amounts of minerals also to it apart from the large quantities of hydrogen in it. Therefore, this water is even more beneficial to users. In other words, the health benefits you can have by drinking this water on a regular basis are much more than what you can get by drinking normal potable water or even water that has only been hydrogenized. Let us delve a little deeper.

1. Researchers have time and again been insisting on the ill effects of fluoride that gets into our body through various sources, the main among them being the water we drink. Some of the negative effects of fluoride on our health are that our bones can become brittle, the functioning of our brain can become haywire and our cognitive development may get decelerated. Fluoride can negatively impact the functioning of our thyroid glands also and this may result in obesity or mental depression. Izumio water can be a panacea for all these issues because it is capable of nullifying the negative effects of fluoride on our system.

2. The so-called potable water we consume daily has been tested a number of times and most of the test results reveal that the water contains lead. Lead is so dangerous that it can retard neurological development in us and cause nervous disorders. Since Izumio water contains lots of hydrogen and a good amount of minerals, it can help us in protecting ourselves from the ill effects of lead.

3. Researches have revealed that certain hormones can wreck havoc on the health of children and, more particularly, on their sexual development. If children are made to drink Izumio water regularly, parents need not worry about this issue.

4. Researchers have also found that Bisphenol-A can lower fertility levels in people and can cause various types of cancers such as breast cancer, prostate cancer, etc. If people drink Izumio water on a regular basis, they can protect themselves from these bad effects of Bisphenol-A.

5. Another cancer-causing substance is chlorophenol and Izumio water can help in preventing this dreadful disease as well.

6. Izumio water is capable of reversing the damages the body cells suffer. Damaged body cells may cause several health issues such as many types of cancers, premature aging, neurological disorders, dementia and so on.

In short, users can derive a number of health benefits by drinking Izumio water regularly.

Ukraine Memories

At about the same time last year, I was in Kremenchuk, Ukraine, giving free English lessons to Russian-speaking locals using new edition coursebooks bought at a bookstore in Bern. I was in strange territories, far from everything familiar.

But however different things looked, sounded, felt, and tasted at first — I sampled my first-ever pizza topped with mayonnaise in Kremenchuk — eventually, it was fairly easy for me to feel at home in the former Soviet republic.

The Ukrainians, I found out, are just like Filipinos: warm, hospitable, and generous. It was a breeze for me to befriend people. Had it not been for the language barrier, I could have made more friends there. My students were exceptionally bright and easy to handle. They were sweet as well, showering me with thank-you gifts and cards at the end of the course. My personal favorite present was a bottle of home-made honey given to me by Nikolai, a Ukrainian pensioner whom I miss so much to this day.

Of course, just like in any other situation, there are exceptions to the rule. How can I forget the cranky Ukrainian shopkeeper who thought I was stealing her ice cream when I took them out of her freezer? But I later “made peace” with her when I returned to her shop four weeks later, bought some fruit juice, and smiled after paying her. She surprisingly smiled back. You see, right after the unpleasant ice cream incident, my American flatmate, an experienced missionary who had been in Ukraine for a long time already, told me that one should let the Ukrainian shopkeepers, many stricken with paranoia, do their job. No customer was supposed to do any ‘product touching.’ “That’s their responsibility,” she said. Well, at least in small stores.

After my English teaching stint and other church volunteer work in Kremenchuk, I hied off to Donetsk, chaperoned by my flatmate, by bus on a seven-hour journey to visit a Filipino missionary who had been doing ministry work there since December 2002. It was a blessing to see Sarita at work, persevering to meet the needs of a local church there and serving the community’s poor and needy whenever she could. And boy, her Russian was impressive!

My last stop was in Kyiv where I welcomed my husband at the Borispol international airport in mid-August, after almost six weeks of separation. We were supposed to do research work together — meeting ministry workers and taking some documentary photos and video shots — for the Manila-based missions school I was accountable to.

We first visited a Swiss-American missionary who has been spearheading a street children ministry with another missionary, an American, for a few years now. Both spoke Russian amazingly well (it served as an inspiration for me…yes, I can be fluent in German if I want to). The children there at the center were surprisingly friendly, and one particular 11-year-old girl warmed up to me completely that she even appointed herself as “the photographer’s assistant,” operating my Nikon SLR camera with so much ease.

We also met some Messianic Jews who would later take us to a rather ill-equipped men’s drug rehabilitation center where former drug addicts, now Christians, shared their life-changing testimonies with us. We saw during the visit that they lacked basic food supplies. And so, we headed off to the nearest supermaket after our talk with them, and bought a whole cake and a bottle of Coca-Cola for their afternoon snack. It was already a big deal for these men who kept saying spaseeba (Russian for “thank you”) to us. That humbled me.

There was also this visit to the Hillsongs Church where a nice lady in the guest relations team gave us the contact information of the CBN (Christian Broadcasting Network) Headquarters there in Kyiv. Both were pleasant experiences — the worship service at the Hillsongs Kyiv and the impromptu ocular inspection of offices and TV studio at CBN Ukraine, courtesy of an accommodating translator named Vitaly. The CBN visit was especially relevant to me since I used to work at CBN Asia based in Manila.

In between these major appointments, we encountered drunk men and hungry streetchildren in malls (they wanted my lunch on two separate occasions), desperate men in costumes who posed with tourists for a small fee, talented buskers, pathetic-looking beggars, and wily con artists. It was…interesting.

Accommodation-wise, our apartment in Kyiv was nothing fancy at all, although it had the basics (kitchen, toilet, and living room with a double bed and a single sofa). I remember sleeping on the bed which could have well been the habitat of a zillion dust mites. Talk about sleeping with enemies! In contrast, Sarita’s apartment in Donetsk was clean and cozy. The one in Kremenchuk, meanwhile, was described as “communistic” by my flatmate. It was there where I had to drag my 28-kilogram luggage all the way up the five flights of stairs reeking with the smell of cat pee (it was pure torture).

Ah, Ukraine. I miss this country, despite the linguistic and logistical challenges a visit entails. I’d like to: 1) hold English lessons in Kremenchuk once again; 2) bring some winter clothing for some of the cash-strapped people in Donetsk who don’t have a heating system in their shanties; 3) cook decent meals at the drug rehab center in Kyiv. Countless possibilities.

Suddenly, I’m reminded of the many things people take for granted here in good ol’ Switzerland. (Note: Also published in Oikos Online.)

RANDOM TIP: Take a peek at my Flickr photo album on Kyiv here. My other Ukraine-related blog posts are the Mashrutka Challenge, Outdoor Market, and Toilet Talk. If you have time to kill, do read them.

Picason Concert

Watch this video before anything else. If a picture can paint a thousand words, a video can paint a million. For this reason, I present to you a video footage of the recent concert of the Salsa Cubana band Picason in my town. Excuse the poor quality of the video; I simply used my digital camera to document the event.

Picason dished out a superb performance during the Biel Braderie (summer festival) in Biel-Bienne. Too bad we missed the first 30 minutes of their concert which started at 8:30 p.m. But the moment we heard their upbeat Latino music and saw the engaging dance number of the vocalists on stage, we were hooked till 10 p.m.

Never mind the fact that I’m not really the type who goes to concerts. But between the Picason concert and the yodeling fest held also in our town two weeks before that, I’d choose the former anytime for obvious reasons. Swiss folk music is not for me — not in the long-term, at least. It’s a bit, um, geriatric for my taste.

Going back to the Picason concert, some of the spectators, Swiss and Latinos alike, let their hair down and swayed to the rhythm of the music. I would have loved to dance the cha cha, but didn’t for two reasons: 1) my husband has two left feet; 2) I don’t normally dance in public (not that I dance a lot in private).

The great thing about this concert was, it was free. We thought we had to buy the Braderie pin to be able to watch the concerts lined up for the three-day summer fest. But that was not the case. We saw lots of visitors, who were not wearing official pins, watching Picason perform live in concert. So we enjoyed it as well, without a pin and without any guilt feelings.

Picason has a number of Swiss musicians on board, most of them instrumentalists. The band really makes good music, and I wouldn’t be surprised if their CDs are almost sold out. Most of the lyrics are in Spanish, if not all.

This group has really piqued my musical interest. I’ll be surfing the Net in the coming days to know more about their brand of music. (Note: You will find another YouTube video on the Picason concert in Biel-Bienne here.)

‘Tiangge’ Challenge

The big box from the Swiss supplier arrived last Wednesday morning. I guess it’s all systems go from hereon.

For the first time in our lives, my husband and I will try our hands at something we’ve never done before: rent a market stall and sell Filipino products at the monthly tiangge (market) in our town next month. After lengthy discussions on the pros and cons, we’ve finally decided to take the leap of faith in the world of fair trade — all for a good cause.

On sale will be bags, toiletries kits, pencil cases, and wallets made from recycled fruit juice and tomato sauce sachets. Proceeds of the sale will benefit the Filipino women who made these wonderful products basically from trash. They don’t ask for doleouts. All they wish is for people to patronize their handmade creations and put them into good use.

I do hope the Swiss will like the unique Pinoy products as much as I like them. Fingers crossed.

RANDOM TIP: Besuchen Sie unseren Marktstand am Bieler Monatsmarkt: 10. August, von 8 Uhr bis 18 Uhr.(Visit our market stall at the Biel monthly market: on August 10, from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.)